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In which Corridor Digital fix the Scorpion King in The Mummy Returns.

youtube.com/watch?v=KH1V6CHO1J

@Jo i've been so enjoying Corridor Crew's videos lately

also their deepfakes experiments kinda creep me out but they're also extremely cool

@Jo i mean its hardly fair to the original animators since they used tech that didnt exist at the time to fix it. It does look so much better though

@drifting_in_circles TBF, even for the early 2000s, it was kind of a disaster.

Plus, they only used the deepfake because the other option was to somehow go back in time and hire early 2000s Dwayne Johnson. XD

@Jo compare it to other 2001 cgi tho like. Final fantasy spirits within was advertised as this cgi masterpiece but it was on the same level of quality. Mummy returns also probably used up its budget on the army of anubis and the mini mummies

@drifting_in_circles I think part of the problem with this scene was overdependence on CGI in this case, on top of the bad editing.

They did say the scorpion body was spot on, but the glaring problems were with the torso and head. If anything, they'd have probably had better luck filming The Rock from the torso up and compositing him over that scene.

Which is sort of techincally what they did with the deepfake, I guess.

Sometimes, bad CGI isn't a matter of tech. :blobsmilesweat:

@Jo most of the time its a matter of time and budget. They also might not have been able to get the rock back for any more filming. For what it was it wasnt bad cgi it just didnt age well at all.

@Jo rewatching the whole scene its mostly just the closeups that dont stand up today. For the most part its pretty good

@Jo it looks much better! Subtler expressions are good, and non-plastic skin reflections.

Also minor annoyance: they kept talking about the "camera sensor" - this is a 2001 movie, it was a film camera. :blobpopcorn:

@polychrome Yeah, I didn't notice that at first, but I suspect that's a case of being used to digital cameras over film than lack of knowledge. :blobthinking:

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